User Data
Short Ghost Stories: The Man with the Axe in his Back

Short Ghost Stories: The Man with the Axe in his Back

by queeniechan
- Trapped in an elevator with a murdered man...
- A woman's foot savaged by something as she reads ghost stories late at night...
- A boy flees from a battlefield, only to be swallowed by a tree...
- A starving family struggles to stay civilised...

Here are 4 spine-chilling stories illustrated in comics-prose for you to read in the early hours of the morning.

IMPORTANT: I will only be posting half of these stories up online. Please purchase the e-book or print book from the links if you want to read the rest.
Add to Favorites
Pages
54
Updates
Completed
Last Update
3 Years Ago
Fans
13
Readers
15

Short Ghost Stories: The Man with the Axe in his Back

- Trapped in an elevator with a murdered man...
- A woman's foot savaged by something as she reads ghost stories late at night...
- A boy flees from a battlefield, only to be swallowed by a tree...
- A starving family struggles to stay civilised...

Here are 4 spine-chilling stories illustrated in comics-prose for you to read in the early hours of the morning.

IMPORTANT: I will only be posting half of these stories up online. Please purchase the e-book or print book from the links if you want to read the rest.

Recent Comments

Hi all! This is all the stories in this collection. Next week, I'll be posting my new story "Fabled Kingdom" up. It's a fairy-tale inspired fantasy story, and the URL is: http://fabledkingdom.smackjeeves.com/ . This will be an on-going story that'll be hundreds of pages long, so I'll be doing this from now on. See you all!
Hi folks! This is the last story in this collection, and after this, I'll start posting my next story "Fabled Kingdom". I'm currently setting FK up, which it'll probably be done next weekend. This week I'm doing volunteer work for Vision Australia, which is a charity for blind and vision impaired people. It's a technology expo for the blind, and it's been pretty good so far!
I'm cloe to finishing Chapter 5 of "Fabled Kingdom" this week. I only have 2 more pages to go, before I start on Chapter 6. Hopefully chapters 6-7 can be done before the end of 2014, so I can collect it into part 1 of 3. :)
@HABE: Thanks. :D Getting it to look natural is always the hardest to do in spot colour. Most of the time it's not meant to look natural but to stand out, so I was quite happy when I got this to work.

Glad you liked the story and art! :)
This is a handsome page. I usually find spot color hit or miss, but this is definitely a hit. The art and story here are the best yet.
Hi all! It's been a mad rush this week - I've inked 2/3 of Chapter 5 of "Fabled Kingdom", which is a big surprise. I've got 10 pages left to go and I hope to start on Chapter 6. I hope to get Chapter 7 done by the end of the year, so I can release the first third of the story in book format. So far, it looks to be about 200 pages for a single book (out of 3). :D
Hi folks! I've only posting half of this story up - if you want to read the SECOND HALF of the story (another 9-10 pages), please buy the ebook or the print book from the links provided.

This is something I plan to do for the rest of my stories. I believe art and webcomics have value, and I believe that while you should give your readers as much sampling as possible, it's not the best to give them EVERYTHING for free.

I believe in giving my readers 60-66% of the story, and if they still want to read more, I feel I'm justified in asking them to pay for it. Conversely, if you read 2/3 of a story and you're meh about it, I suggest you don't purchase the book. I'd rather have a happy reader than an unhappy one, money or not. So far, no one's complained about the unfairness of this, so I'm sticking to it!
The most interesting thing about this is that without the pictures, the reader wouldn't know that Cassie is a black woman. The story's written in first-person perspective, and no references are made to the narrator's skin colour throughout. In the prose-only version story, it's very likely that the reader would assume that Cassie is white, because that's the DEFAULT for most main characters.

This difference is actually quite IMPORTANT. If you're a person of colour, you are probably 10 times more likely to pick up references to people's skin colour in prose. Conversely, if you're white, even if you read about a character's "dark skin" in a novel, you may not necessarily picture them as a black or asian person.

You can see this play out in the "Rue controversy" in the Hunger Games movie adaptation. When the producers cast a black girl in the role of Rue, there were anger from some readers, which is bizarre because Rue is described has having DARK-BROWN SKIN in the books. Apparently a lot of (presumably white) people read that description and just TOTALLY GLOSSED over it. Whereas I'm pretty sure that a black reader who read Hunger Games would have picked it up immediately.

We live in a world with SO FEW depictions of black people, that unless you DRAW a black person, people are going to assume that all your characters are white. Even if you describe them as having dark brown skin.
@HABE: Aww, thanks. :) I liked this 'twist' too...
Useful Stuff!
Hi all! I'm still super-busy, would you BELIEVE, but I managed to make some time to create something useful. I have hear ALL the comic panels from "The Man with the Axe in his Back" in this Tumblr post.

I plan to use this as part of a series of "comics-prose" tutorials/articles I want to write as part of a group on DeviantArt. I haven't established a group for it yet, but I shall at the end of this year.

The point of ripping all the comics from the comics-prose story is simple. Creating comics-prose is similar to doing compressed story-telling in comics, except you embellish the comic story-telling with prose. When you look at all the panels I've ripped you, you can tell it's almost like a SUMMARY of the entire story. You may not be able to tell WHY anything is happening, but you should be able to follow the general GIST of the story. For those looking for some insight into the production process of comics-prose, this may be very useful as a guide.
UUUGGGGH This week not only is my Internet shot, but I didn't get the time to do all the stuff I wanted to get finished. I'm going to Brisbane Comic-Con this weekend, AND then Sydney Comic-Con next weekend. It's gonna be crazy, so I hope I get some time after this to post some commentary and some new posts. :O
Ahh, I had such a busy week, it's unbelievable. I'm kinda super tired, and I have two conventions coming up in the next 2 weekends. I wish I can do some commentary right now, but I kinda gotta ZZZZZZZZZZ... See you all next week!
@HABE: Oh wow, I never thought of that either!! XD YOU GIVE ME GOOD IDEAS ACTUALLY!
For a second I thought the blood was dripping out of the panel to color the text. That suggests another cool way to present the interplay between art and words in a prose comic. You give me good ideas.
Again, some repetition. Not a huge issue.
Some repetition/redundancy there, with the description of the axe in the man's back. The good news about this is that it can sometimes clear up misconceptions about what the audience is really seeing. Thanks to my weird monitor, while you can see there's blood, you can't always tell it's an axe.

Despite the redundancy, I don't mind the picture of a man with an axe in his back, FOLLOWED by a paragraph describing that exact same thing. It seems redundant, but while the words describe the picture, they also EMBELLISH it. As I said before, some repetition is unavoidable in comics-prose.
@HABE: Hey, that's an interesting one! I actually didn't realise that you can interprete it as the man not being there!

(As I said, it worked so well in the prose-only version. I just loathe to let it go. Ultimately, I feel that the problem was because I wrote the story in prose first. If I'd done it in comics form first, perhaps that "man's back" panel would be on the next page, and the problem would be lessened.)
@HABE: Sometimes this can lead to redundancies, but it's unavoidable in this format. I try to minimise if I can. Usually it's just changing a few words! :D
@HABE: Thanks. :) There'll be a lot more to follow. I personally am tired of doing comics the "traditional" way - I'm just over it. Nothing WRONG with it... I have new stories to tell, and I'm now going to tell them in this format. :)