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Sire

Sire

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Les Miserables. The Phantom of the Opera. A lit nerd and her antisocial alternate persona learn that classic fictional stories may not be quite so fictional.

Sire updates Wednesdays. Patreon backers are four weeks ahead of everyone else.

Art and writing by Alexis Royce. ChibiSilverWings is listed as a coauthor because she likes to get comment emails. All of the comment emails.
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Sire

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Les Miserables. The Phantom of the Opera. A lit nerd and her antisocial alternate persona learn that classic fictional stories may not be quite so fictional.

Sire updates Wednesdays. Patreon backers are four weeks ahead of everyone else.

Art and writing by Alexis Royce. ChibiSilverWings is listed as a coauthor because she likes to get comment emails. All of the comment emails.

Recent Comments

Question;
Can we get a desktop version of this? creepy as it is, it's also kinda cool. I mean; I know, dramatic creepy moment & all, but a desktop version of this image (mmmaybe without the text) would be pretty damned cool.
"Home" in this case means the US. She wanted to go home, but they can't because Paul is dead and they're on the run because of it. So they can't go home.
Guest
October 19th, 2018
@wilddeath: yeah, same.
im sorry... what? is this actually the next page? i feel like i missed something.
Guest
October 18th, 2018
Mood Whiplash !
Oh yeah. Had kinda forgotten she did that.
Welp, time for a mutiny
I wonder if the birds will listen to him or not...
@TriforceP: <3
Curtis IS a good boy
Pirate Parrots POUNCE!
shylarah
September 29th, 2018
Birds are awesome
and I learned things today!
@shylarah: bugs lots and lots of bugs
Half joking = half right. Called it!
Yar. It be a pirate's life fer me.
shylarah
September 11th, 2018
Do we remember what her worst fear is...?
You're gonna need a bigger lock on those cages.
Look, you have to be able to apprehend the suspect. And when they're all fully flighted, it might be somewhat difficult.

Curtis would sell you out for a pat on the head, though. He's not a parrotlet, he's a stool pigeon.
Writing for Birds, part two:
Just like dogs or cats, many species of pet parrot have the emotional awareness to tell when someone is upset. If you consistently use a phrase to help them calm down or soothe them they're upset, it's not impossible that they might turn it around on you, and use that same phrase to soothe you back. We could argue whether this counts as real empathy, or if pets just don't like seeing their owner all boring and sad.

Then again, you could make the same argument regarding humans cheering each other up, too.
You know, there are a lot of writers out there who don't know how to write parrot dialogue. So here's a quick primer in case you ever want to include talking birds in your story.

The way people do it wrong: A human character will say a phrase, and the parrot will repeat it a couple times. It's not to say that a bird will never do this. But it assumes that birds just kind of randomly hit upon a sound they like, and immediately replicate it. It's good for a joke, but it's gonna sound off and doesn't treat the bird like a thinking creature.

A clever creature, like a parrot, can recognize that words or sounds have contexts. They won't understand the literal meaning or etymology of a phrase, but they can call upon phrases they've heard as an attempt to replicate the context in which they've heard it. So, if an owner says "Come here!" Whenever they open the door to their cage, a parrot can start using it independently, calling "Come here!" to their owner, as a request to have their cage door opened. They don't understand the literal meaning, however, so they might even ignore parts of the phrase, or remix it their own way, calling out "Here here come hereeeee," especially when they're younger or still learning a phrase. It takes a while for a bird to learn a new word or phrase, so the "instantly hearing something and repeating" idea is just plain not how they work.

Captain Flint is a very old bird, and a sailor, so she's going to talk like one. Honestly, everyone develops a vocabulary based on their surroundings, and has their own way of asking or demanding what they want, based on how they've been given things in the past. It's a good way to consider any dialogue. Parrots are just super blunt about it.