Drawing On-Model

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Drawing On-Model

Postby Durvin » March 24th, 2012, 11:28 am

Keeping characters on model is something I have a lot of trouble with. Like, I am completely unable to do it. Completely. I have really unsteady hands, and I don't think I could ever do it. For me personally, I don't care which character is taller, and limbs can change length as needed. C'mon, it's a cartoon, right? I never claimed to be drawing realistically; this is why I'm doing a comic about comedy archetypes and wacky cyborgs. It just doesn't seem important to me.

So. What's everybody's feelings on things staying on-model? I know not everybody agrees with me.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby RyoSoulreaper » March 24th, 2012, 11:33 am

I've been taught drawing realistically(like everything is proportionate) vastly helps in drawing people in any style or anything really.

Granted I'm guilty of just drawing whatever the hell I want and to hell with realism but I still think it should be something to be worked with.

AS for what you have here, yeah it's true that in a comedy/cartoony style you can ignore proper proportion and do it whatever but if you are doing a serious type project then they should follow the rules of proportion or whatever you call it.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby Seven Rain » March 24th, 2012, 1:57 pm

I used to go by the "I have my own style and don't need to learn proper Anatomy!" mindset... Until somewhere around half-way through the Wings chapter. At which point I started being disgusted with my old pages and panels where characters' waists were as thin as their wrists and other nonsense. I took some time to try and get used to basic Anatomy so I could at least have bearable proportions and whatnot.
I still struggle a bit with consistency but I'm much happier with my characters in general after that shift, which is what lead me to decide to spend a bit of time behind the scenes slowly redrawing most of the panels in my Prologue and first Chaper to replace the old pages with later on.
Though since I know a lot of people like seeing the bad old pages and being able to see the improvement from old to new, I plan on keeping the old pages available, but I digress.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby redandblack64 » March 24th, 2012, 7:08 pm

For me, basing my character's face, body language and expressions off of a real person or 3 helps a ton, even if they're drawn simplistically, stylized or realistically. I do this after drawing the real deal first. On top of all that, having a solid grasp on anatomy keeps things consistent because I don't make a bunch of fundamental mistakes.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby Zhriffixx » March 26th, 2012, 7:05 pm

As a general rule-of-thumb strange/wonky proportions are usually alright in some cartooning styles as long as it's consistent. For instance, if a character has a weirdly skinny body, then they'll have a weirdly skinny body all throughout the work. Wonky body proportions is all about inventing your own rules and sticking to them. The biggest challenge with this, however, is that the new rules are usually based off of realistic anatomy rules (e.g. the annoying proverb of having the learn the rules to break them). It's always beneficial to learn/understand real anatomy better, regardless if you want to apply the rules directly to the wonky style or not.

Regarding actual off-modelness, this is my opinion: a little difference here or there is okay for sure, but if it's noticeable enough to make seasoned readers unsure of who someone is, it's probably a problem. On the other hand, if the readers can read through a comic and still recognize the characters and understand the plot despite a bit of off-modelness, I still think the comic could be considered successful. If the off-modelness is confusing readers, interfering with the reader's ability to read the comic (e.g. all they can see is that huge nose rather than the punch-line in the corner) and otherwise causing unnecessary problems that could be fixed with better proportions, however, I think it's something worth changing.

Personally, my biggest problem with off-modelness is keeping character's clothing consistent. I keep on forgetting if someone's wearing laced boots vs. non-laced boots, if a vest has a collar, or if someone's shirt is tied off at the waist or not. Sometimes when I'm inking I see pencils where someone's jacket just completely vanishes! Body proportions I'm not usually that bad about, though sometimes I draw character's faces pretty badly and have to edit them later using Photoshop.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby momoismyname » March 30th, 2012, 4:52 am

if put more effort into it~could it be done someday~^^

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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby Wulfmune » March 31st, 2012, 7:07 am

I started becoming more self conscious of drawing on model after spending hours creating my hero in dragon age XD;;. Spinning them around and trying to make them not look stupid from a certain angle got me thinking more of my 2D characters in a 3D space. Still practicing, but I think as long as you've got your mind set on it, it will keep getting better.
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Re: Drawing On-Model

Postby Vitotamito » March 31st, 2012, 2:41 pm

That's a really big problem for me when animating, which is why I use Flash Puppets. I never have to worry about the character going off model because it's impossible not to be on model.
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