Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

A place for folks to discuss the professional side of comics and webcomics.

Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby xkrazydog » June 15th, 2011, 8:41 pm

By the suggestion of Gibson Twist and Eishiya, I now present you with an artist alley guide to tabling! These are mainly just simple tips and tricks i picked up on the past few tabling experiences I did have. Keep in mind, I don't make a killing at conventions I've just been to enough to know what sells and how to go about it, aside from Anime cons I have also tabled at MoCCAfest.

Obtaining a table:
How doth one obtain this table of which you speak?

-Always keep on top of Convention news. If you're not on the email list (i know i'm not) then don't hesitate to email the convention staffers for an approximate date/time period when artist alley applications DO go up. Generally Artist alley sign ups happen after Panel/Event sign ups go up and the dealer room applications are available. Popping in on forums is also a good idea since artists have a section of the forums.

-Artist Alley tables are ALWAYS in demand. but the supply of tables are 9/10 very limited. If you don't happen to get a table at an upcoming convention, don't be too down about it. There's always next year, and nowadays new cons spring up all over for you to always take another chance at!

-Artist alleys will NEVER ask for money up front, There will be an application process, followed by confirmation and then payment, finally they'll send you instructions/open for requests on tabling needs. If they do ask for money up front chances are it's a scam or the people who run it have no experience at running an artist alley! Be sure to research and ask those who tabled before on their experiences too!

-If you can't afford a table, don't let it hinder you on applying anyway! Unless you really don't want to attend the con, having a table available is only a benefit to you. If you can't afford it someone will gladly share if you make it available on the forums or other art communities like SJ and dA!

-At big conventions located in a large city can range from 100- 200 dollars. Pricey right? Don't be turned off by the number, that usually means the traffic and sheer amount of attendance is very very high! and High attendance is a good thing. These prices are easily manageable if you split it with someone else. Also! Certain conventions include different things! For example, New York animefest tables may cost 275 dollars but they include 2 weekend badges Along with the table! so you can order the table and your attendance pass all in one go!

-If you're splitting a table with a real life friend, apply seperately, that way it raises your chances of obtaining a table. However! Please don't be greedy! If you have 2 and you don't need it make it available to other friends of interest or return it so someone else on the waiting list can! The more artists in an artist alley the better! The artist alley will thank you.

-Note, NEVER table with more than 3 people. Hell, 3 people can even be a stretch sometimes. I would only ever suggest 3 if you don't have enough stuff, the tables are wayyy too expensive (in the case of actual comic conventions such as MoCCafest, SPX or Comic Cons) or you're only going for self promotion! (more info on this in the actual tabling section) Most artist alleys give you up to 2 or 3 assistant tag/badges for helpers and tablemates that you attach to the actual purchased Convention badge.

-Usually artists are given up to ONE hour before and after the convention opens to set up. Most also have pre-registration pick ups and artist alley pick ups the night before. USE THIS TIME TO SET UP AND PLAN.

-Don't hesitate to ask questions to the Con staff. I've always emailed them questions if they don't send certain follow up information. I.e: Hours of operation, location of the Artist alley in relativity to the con, Table size, Whether they physically lock up the Artist alley after hours, availability of electric outlets, and Table cloths.

Tabling Presentation
Okay so you have the table, now what? How do you know if people will actually stop and look at your stuff?

-Generally, Tables are around 6 feet. The sizes themselves vary, so if you split the table each person gets approximately 3 feet of space. If anymore than 2 people, you're limited to even less space. But keep in mind to look at the table 3 dimensionally.

-Never just put things flat on the table. If you're entire table is just flat, no one will see it unless they're walking past on close proximity. Some displays can be seen from Across the Artist hall, and that's a good thing! If you're selling actual comics/illustration books, stack them then prop it up standing up. People will see it better. If you're selling buttons, tags, keychains, then stick them on a display and prop those up too! If you're selling t-shirts keep them neatly folded and let one lean open and high OR have a photo display of the actual shirt and let that sign stand upright!

Why won't people come take a look, you say? Generally people are very, very timid. They don't want to crowd around tables because they don't want to hurt feelings if they aren't interested and walk away. Also because conventions have many events, some people just like to browse quickly and window shop. They can't window shop properly if you're merchandise isn't in plain sight.

-Print displays are a tricky one. Prints take up a lot of space, and you never want to just lay them flat on the table because they may be too large and waste space. There's been 2 very common methods people use to have them.

++The first method is PCV pipe display. What you'll need is 2 table clamps, some 1-2 inch Piping and pipe connectors. The pipes and connectors are very cheap and can be bought at most hardware stores for a dollar or two a piece. The clamps are about 20$ each, of which you need 2. These pipes will make a frame on your table and and you can easily hang prints on them coming down from above.
Pro's:
-They take up almost NO table space. Which is a HUGE benefit so you can sell plenty of other things on the actual table top itself.
-You can also hang other displays and signs on them too like commission signs, or buttons/keychains on display boards on the sides.

Con's: The Pipe display is prone to falling, especially at very crowded cons and if there's alot of people surrounding it. And the last thing you want is people to get hurt.
-If you don't have a lot to display it can look very flimsy and unappealing.

+++the second method is collapsible meshwire cubes. Meshwire storage cubes are available at any large department store such as Target, Walmart and Kmart. The price is generally cheap, costing no more than 20 dollars for a box. These cubes are build-able and can be used to make a net wall to hang prints and displays, or a tower of cubes to also make a nice raised box display.

Pro's:
-extremely customizable. I see people who build walls around the table to make an actual welcoming booth to hang prints on the sides as well as the front. So you don't have to make it into just cubes.
-Because it's wire, you can also hang displays up.
-The cubes themselves make nice shelves so you don't have to keep reaching under the table to rummage through your stuff to pull out merchandise.
-Can be more attractive to look at then the PCV pipe display.

Con's:
-Heavy. The PCV pipes and clamps are heavy, but Meshwire cubes can be heavier. If you drive or live close by this may not be a problem, but those who commute using public transport or plane may have a problem. A solution i found with this is to have a tablemate who also uses cubes. Then you only have to bring HALF the amount of cubes to carry.
-Customizability comes with time. It takes time to build it up but this can be bypassed if you have more helping hands.

-Clusterf*** is bad
Remember when i said more people isn't always a good thing? It's not. People like to see different things available to them, but people DON'T like to see a myriad of styles of which they do not know who's art is who's! With more than 3 people displaying art it's hard for you, the artists to organize the table, move around and do business. Yes Business takes up space. And it's even more intimidating for people to come up to such a cramped place with no idea who to talk to. Trust me, a few friends who mistakenly had 4 on a table vouched it was the worst experience of their life, and their sales tanked so far into the earth's core. Beware!

-Table cloth is important!
If the con doesn't provide table cloths, then please get one! A bare naked table with stuff on hard wood and plastic is very unappealing! A quick fix solution is just sneak out a bedsheet from your hotel room! And make sure it's long. If you have a long table cloth you can stash your suitcase, merchandise and supplies under the table without fear of it being seen or stolen!

-If tight for space, Put up only the pieces you want to be seen! This includes you're latest works and the best looking ones! A piece may be dear to your heart but if it's not a display of your current skills and talents, then you should put it aside for something better!

-Have a sketchbook on the table for people to flip through! People like to see sketches. People also like to see that you can do traditional and will highlight your best when it comes to comissions!

-A portfolio book for any other prints/works you want to show off/ or sell can also be displayed on the table top =). Once again, people like to flip through things. It engages them more and gets them curious for everything you have to offer.

[url]Original Vs. Fanart[/url]

Ahh... the big question.

-At small comic conventions: Fanart is a big NO, Small independent comic conventions such as SPX, APE and MoCCA look down at fanart! You can have them available but generally that crowd isn't looking to find fanart but actual original stuff. This creator owned niche atmosphere is very precious to them and they really don't look highly on people who are there to simply make money. Also the indy and published comic scene is very very small, you don't want a bad reputation!

-Comic Cons: Tabling at comic cons are extremely expensive and are mostly catered to professionals. You see a mix of fanart and original stuff but that's because these main stream artists were previously hired by Marvel/DC/Oni etc. and do have the permission and the reputation to get away with it. I've also heard that they wont hesitate to mock/ridicule amateurs and upcoming artists if their stuff isn't up to snuff.

-Anime cons/Superhero cons: Fanart is a big big big seller. 90% of the things you will see in Artist alleys at anime cons will be Fanart. But this isn't to say original stuff DOESN'T Sell because they do. If something is well drawn and appealing, people will buy it simply for aesthetic reasons. My recommendation is if you really want to display your originals, don't hesitate to do so! There are original art appreciators out there and they will buy it!

If yes to fanart what do i draw??
If you're really in for the money there are always extremely popular fads of the now. At one year it was Hetalia, another year it was Durara, then another it was pokemon etc. But there's some points you should know:

-what's popular wont guarantee it will sell. Simply because there will be 10 other people who do it too and likely draw it better than you do. If so, you should hope you're doing something unique with it or more than just a pretty faceshot on a print! These fads also fade rather quickly especially if said fanbase has an equal amount of those who think its overrated! But it never hurts to catch the wave before others! When the new pokemon for black and white were introduced, even before they were westernized, my tablemate sold bookmarks of them and they sold simply because no one else had them at the time.

-There are some things that don't simply "fade out" mostly classics and video games. Final fantasy usually has its chiseled fanbase already, as does Legend of zelda, and of course Kingdom hearts. These things will almost always be recognized. But remember, many others have drawn it too so the competition is fierce.

-Go with what you like. Honestly, if something happens to be popular and you DO like it, go with that rather than something you despise but you know every 16 year old fan adores. Your art shows what you love and what you hate more than you think it does. And atleast if it doesnt sell, you know you drew something you love and don't regret drawing for out of respect for the series.

-Use making fanart as a learning experience. Conventions aren't worth it if you aren't willing to learn and get better. I despise drawing fanart but i use it as practice for experimental coloring/ composition etc. Then you'll get something personal out of it =).


Promoting yourself.
Hey! Look at me! Look at my stuff! Know me!

-Business cards.
Business cards are very important. (why dont i have one yet sob), If you plan to make business cards, make them nice, make them colorful. Make them show others who YOU are and what you make. People make business cards all the time and they're handed out at cons like candy. If they dont remember you and your card and can't connect two and two together, they will end up throwing said card in the bin. So make it clear.

-Contact information on EVERYTHING.
If you have a print, on the corner put your website, your deviantart, your logo, your signature, your email, something so they can connect it back to you. Make it small, but be sure it's there!

-If you want to sell a comic, make it available for sale However people wont dish out 10 or 20 bucks for it if they dont know what its about and don't know you. So make free mini comic (small excerpt) give aways with every purchase or something! It hurts to hand away sweat and tears, but sometimes it must be done! You can't catch fishes without bait afterall.

-Trade and give away small stuff to other artists at the artist alleys. Networking is good. And if you're going to be conventioning from now on, you may as well get to know the local artists. Who knows, maybe they'll one day table with you in the future!


If you didn't get a table, this mostly goes for Small press indie con go'ers: Attend anyway, get to know artists, Hand out minicomics and spread your work around. Artists at these conventions LOVE comic trades, or just receiving other people's works in general! Although i may never attend Moccafest or SPX for a long time as a tabler, I will be handing out minis every year i can simply because the atmosphere is just great! and who knows what editors or well known webcomicer you may spread your comic to!

Some stuff to sell:

-Prints-
If you're an illustrator, prints are the way to go. Even if you're not, prints let other people see you from afar and gives them something to put on their walls. I'm lucky and my dad has a fantastic photo studio that allows me to make nice photo prints, but Costco is also a good place to get them done.
Just to let everyone know: Matte and Lustre prints do better than Glossy! Unless it's cardstock gloss, stay away from Glossy prints! They tend to have too much of glare when hung up!

------ A note on sizes: Bigger is usually better. never have a large one and a medium large one, have drastic variation in sizes! My preference is always 11x14 and 8x10's of the same print or 12x18 and 8x12 of the same print! people sometimes make small prints (like 5x7), i don't think that's adviseable unless you dont have a business card. they can easily be wrecked and tossed out without a hesitation. Also if someone is unsure if they want your stuff and leaning to yes, the last thing you want to do is miss a good sale of a 10 dollar print, but he/she ends up walking away with a 2$ mini print he will end up losing along the road.

Recommended sizes: 12x18, 11x14, 8x10's 5x7's.

Posters:
For anything BIGGER than what you need above. I never make anything big enough for huge poster sizes but they're also there.
Sizes include: 16x20, 24x30, 30x40.

-Buttons:
Invest in a button machine if you can! these babies are great for promotion too! if you have a logo or your comic/original stuff does, making button sets in the future is a good idea. Buttons are also Extremely popular at conventions, especially if they have cute little fanart on it.
Buttons can also sway that large print sale if you say you'll toss in a button for free of every print purchase ;).

Bookmarks:
Bookmarks are also a popular choice to make. People tend to laminate them or get them printed online on thick gloss cardstock either is a good choice. I'm not a huge bookmark buyer, but its one of those small things that if pretty, people will like (especially if they come with a small tassle and charm/bell which you can get online or on ebay). On the otherhand, a matching bookmark is a good hand to hand product if you're selling an actual Comic book!

Postcards:
Also a popular thing to sell though i don't think too highly on them since they steer away from print sales and i doubt many people will use them. (not very practical in the digital age, huh?)

Cellphone charms and Keychains:
Popular especially for those who do chibis. You basically print something out, doubleside attach them, laminate them, then stick them with a cellphone strap or keychain ring. They look kinda flimsy to me so i dont tend to bother but if its cute i'll buy it.
Then there's those who actually get plastic transparent keychains used to put photos in and just stick something in there. Far more durable but a little more expensive.

Crafts:
Lately crafts have been super popular! especially those who make custom jewelry, beadded charms, plushies and friendship bracelets! Kind of pricey but definitely a fresh air from those who are tired of the same old same old.

Tshirts: Tshirts are popular. Original Tshirts sell really well at non-anime conventions, but Tshirts are always on the lookout for those who find something graphically pleasing, witty, or cute. (Zombie crossing tshirts are always my favorite lol)

Commissions: Remember guys, you are artists! Sketch/ ink/ color comissions should be available if you can do it! If you don't mind drawing for others, this is a good income especially if you're a great draftsman.
-Don't hesitate to raise prices for more characters/backgrounds/color/ stuff you're uncomfortable drawing.
-Don't hesitate to decline a commission if you don't feel comfortable drawing it or if the person is creepy.
-Put your contact information/signature on your work!
-Use thicker set paper or REALLY nice presentable sketchbook paper. Don't draw a masterpiece on toilet paper as they say!
-Get the person's cell number/email to text them if its complete.
-If you're bogged down with commissions don't hesitate to decline that too, or ask if you can mail it to them after the con if they really want it.
-Don't be down if said person doesn't like the outcome of the commission. They should understand that conventions are very stressful period and if you sold it for them for relatively cheap, they paid for the quality and your effort.

Seller's tips and Information

-CHANGE- Atleast have 100 dollars on hand in change! People who go to conventions are whipping out 20's left and right and if you don't have change that's a lost sale for you! As the convention drags on change shouldn't be that hard to have on hand but, more never hurts! If you're in desperate need of change, find a place to eat, buy something small with a 20 to break it then run back!

-Keep your cashbox safe!
Cashboxes are kind of heavy so an envelope, waistpack, or a spare wallet with your money organized also helps. Keep it close at all times! NEVER leave it behind, even after closing hours.

-Make deals if you can! if you're selling large prints for 10 dollars, maybe you can make an additional smaller print be half off! or maybe it comes with a free button/mini comic! Small deals will really tip the scale of the unsure buyer. (common ones are 10.each, a second 8x10 for 15. Or 8$ each, 2 for $15 etc.) If you have good deals, they'll bring their friends to see your stuff too!

-Eat well before and after the convention!
Even if you didn't do well, treat yourself to a nice meal! conventions are stressful and take alot out of you, just surviving is an accomplishment in itself. Also chances are you didnt eat much during the con, and if you did, it was junk.

-Have snacks with you at the table and waterbottles! You will forget to eat, and you don't want to collapse.

-Leave the table if you can, but if you do make sure someone is there to watch! Assistant badges are given out for a reason, hopefully your tablemate can watch your stuff for you when you go to the bathroom or want to see a panel etc. Don't think "it'll only take 2 minutes" chances are it wont. Bathrooms have lines, food vendors have lines, and browsing around the con swarming with crowds can take anywhere from half an hour to 2 hours! Don't feel guilty to stretch your legs and have fun! You paid for the convention too!

Item preparation:

-Hand sanitizer- Touching food and then your merchandise is gross. Counting money is gross too. Keep clean bring one with you. please.
-Portfolio book with transparent sleeves- Useful to have for smaller prints and if you have more things to show!
-Sketchbook
-Bristol paper/thickset heavy weight paper such as cardstock. For commissions. People will be really disappointed if you hand regular copy paper with your beautiful art on it. Thicker paper means it can hold more, wont bend as easily and can take ink as well as raise the value of the art.
-Paper/inkpens/ general art supplies/ sharpies for signing prints.
-Snack items! Very important!
-Paperwork if you pre-registered online or need a receipt verification for your tables!
-Bags/ sleeves/envelopes for customers to use and hold.
-Colorful fun shaped post its for putting prices up.
-Business cardsssss!!!
-CHANGE


On another note: BE SURE TO CHECK YOUR HOTEL ROOM FOR BEDBUGS. I SWEAR TO GOD >8(

Phew!!
Image
User avatar
xkrazydog
 
Posts: 1960
Joined: August 4th, 2007, 10:33 pm
Location: somewhere here. somewhere there.

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby Gibson Twist » June 15th, 2011, 9:33 pm

Comprehensive! Much more so than any other single resource I've seen. Thanks for doing that, must have taken forever. I'm going to use the shit out of this!
User avatar
Gibson Twist
 
Posts: 1710
Joined: August 13th, 2006, 9:38 pm
Location: Lost

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby xkrazydog » June 15th, 2011, 10:05 pm

I hope its useful to everyone. I was thinking of posting up a photo of our table at AnimeNext but 8( it looks kinda lame.
Image
User avatar
xkrazydog
 
Posts: 1960
Joined: August 4th, 2007, 10:33 pm
Location: somewhere here. somewhere there.

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby meganlee » June 15th, 2011, 10:48 pm

Wow! Thanks! A friend of mine asked if I'd share a table with her if she got one at one of the upcomming conventions, but she'd never done it and neither had I, so we had no idea what to even expect.

Artists aren't bugged if you hand out mini-comics even if you didn't get a table? I made one to try and promote my comic, but then freaked out at the idea of having to leave my house and talk to people, so it's still in my folder, waiting for me to find some courage.
Image
(it's totally a link)
User avatar
meganlee
 
Posts: 9
Joined: June 3rd, 2011, 12:41 pm
Location: tacoma, WA

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby YakkitySax » June 16th, 2011, 1:27 am

xkrazydog wrote:I hope its useful to everyone. I was thinking of posting up a photo of our table at AnimeNext but 8( it looks kinda lame.


I want the picture. I don't care how lame it looks. :C
I love you, spam bots.
jan83fry wrote:It's my pleasure to get an opportunity to discuss in this reputed forum. I love seeing people thrive online. It's such a great opportunity I have today.

My Sketchbook
User avatar
YakkitySax
 
Posts: 2236
Joined: November 3rd, 2010, 1:47 pm
Location: IT'S GON' RAIN

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby eishiya » June 16th, 2011, 9:18 am

meganlee wrote:Artists aren't bugged if you hand out mini-comics even if you didn't get a table? I made one to try and promote my comic, but then freaked out at the idea of having to leave my house and talk to people, so it's still in my folder, waiting for me to find some courage.

As long as you're handing it out for free and you're walking around rather than camping out at one spot, and don't set up any kind of display, most people won't mind.
Image
User avatar
eishiya
 
Posts: 9487
Joined: December 5th, 2009, 11:17 am

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby Guest » June 16th, 2011, 9:52 am

This is pretty awesome thing you've put together here, krazy. :) Copy and pasted to a word document for safe-keeping, too. ;) Thank you for taking the time to type all this up!
Guest
 

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby KirbyHead » June 16th, 2011, 9:37 pm

Nice guide! I'm pretty disillusioned about having a table (I've done it twice in the past, and didn't even make enough to cover the table/ticket cost), but this seems like it'll be super useful for other people who are starting out. Maybe they'll have more luck then I did. ;D

Though I have seen Clusterfuck work on occasion, though, but that was more like two artists with many different styles sharing one table and having a ridiculous amount of merchandise that almost overflowed onto other tables. They made mad money, though. I think a lot of people were attracted to how dense the table seemed: there weren't any spaces or gaps between the art and prints and other merchandise that was on display, and that sort of beckoned people to come closer so they could make out each picture. At least, that's what happened to me.
User avatar
KirbyHead
 
Posts: 1620
Joined: October 3rd, 2009, 2:17 pm
Location: Somewhere over the proverbial rainbow.

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby xkrazydog » June 17th, 2011, 9:21 am

KirbyHead wrote:Nice guide! I'm pretty disillusioned about having a table (I've done it twice in the past, and didn't even make enough to cover the table/ticket cost), but this seems like it'll be super useful for other people who are starting out. Maybe they'll have more luck then I did. ;D

Though I have seen Clusterfuck work on occasion, though, but that was more like two artists with many different styles sharing one table and having a ridiculous amount of merchandise that almost overflowed onto other tables. They made mad money, though. I think a lot of people were attracted to how dense the table seemed: there weren't any spaces or gaps between the art and prints and other merchandise that was on display, and that sort of beckoned people to come closer so they could make out each picture. At least, that's what happened to me.


Variety and Variety of styles on a table is fine so long as the art belongs to at minimum, 2 people. But when 4 or 5 people put their art on the table it then becomes a clusterf*** table and people who see it, wont know who's art is who's and gets confused/intimidated to disappoint the others. Congoers are timid afterall. Also individually these 4 or 5 artists wont make alot because people aren't very eager to blow 40 or 50 dollars on one table when they have a whole Artist alley to think about some customers would prefer to buy something small or 1 print from an artist they like and move on.
Image
User avatar
xkrazydog
 
Posts: 1960
Joined: August 4th, 2007, 10:33 pm
Location: somewhere here. somewhere there.

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby stripedwine » June 17th, 2011, 10:53 am

-takes notes-

I WANNA DO MOCCA NEXT YEAR ;_;
Image
(Especially likes the gay robot porn.)

Image

I left my ♥ in Vancouver.
User avatar
stripedwine
 
Posts: 2154
Joined: January 13th, 2008, 9:17 pm
Location: Kuiper Belt

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby xkrazydog » June 17th, 2011, 1:17 pm

eishiya wrote:
meganlee wrote:Artists aren't bugged if you hand out mini-comics even if you didn't get a table? I made one to try and promote my comic, but then freaked out at the idea of having to leave my house and talk to people, so it's still in my folder, waiting for me to find some courage.

As long as you're handing it out for free and you're walking around rather than camping out at one spot, and don't set up any kind of display, most people won't mind.


They aren't as receptive at Anime conventions (since comics isn't as sellable), but general comic conventions: it's like a calling card. They love comic trades and receiving free comics even if it's something small.
YakkitySax wrote:
xkrazydog wrote:I hope its useful to everyone. I was thinking of posting up a photo of our table at AnimeNext but 8( it looks kinda lame.


I want the picture. I don't care how lame it looks. :C


Done.
Image
My stuff is on the right, My partner's was on the left. It's hard to see but on the table i placed smaller variants of the prints for people to get a better look at if they cant see the ones above. My partner's lovely portfolio book is also on display and next to it is my sketchbook with the first page open. I got alot of commissions through that alone.

stripedwine wrote:-takes notes-

I WANNA DO MOCCA NEXT YEAR ;_;


I do too! But only if the price of a table wasn't so high! And if i had more original comics to sell!
Honestly, a lovely Aquapunk display must happen.
I think Toilet Genie was at Moccafest 2 years ago. I remember that table xD though the author wasn't there at the time. It was very popular though, with posters and a really nice set up.
Image
User avatar
xkrazydog
 
Posts: 1960
Joined: August 4th, 2007, 10:33 pm
Location: somewhere here. somewhere there.

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby DesireFreedom » June 17th, 2011, 1:39 pm

I run a group on Deviantart: http://comic-makers-club.deviantart.com/
I would be SO honored if you would assist there! You obviously know a LOT about this type of thing!
Image
I make smackjeeves layouts! And I can work with any budget, including "I cannot pay you a single dime..." so send me a note!
Completed Layouts: Bitter-Sweet, From The Back of a Dodrio, Flavescent, Zero Degree Void.
Working on: None, currently
User avatar
DesireFreedom
 
Posts: 40
Joined: June 9th, 2011, 6:36 pm
Location: SouthWest

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby stripedwine » June 17th, 2011, 5:24 pm

xkrazydog wrote:I do too! But only if the price of a table wasn't so high! And if i had more original comics to sell!
Honestly, a lovely Aquapunk display must happen.
I think Toilet Genie was at Moccafest 2 years ago. I remember that table xD though the author wasn't there at the time. It was very popular though, with posters and a really nice set up.


I know Henry and I were thinking about going in on one together, and trying to get the likes of Kevin and Liz to join us... if that were to happen, you'd be welcome to put something out too? How much are they, btw? :s I tried looking it up right after this year's, but all the site said was to call them for more info. Boo.

PS- I would totally wear a costume if I had a table. Time to reinvent the definition of "booth babe".
Image
(Especially likes the gay robot porn.)

Image

I left my ♥ in Vancouver.
User avatar
stripedwine
 
Posts: 2154
Joined: January 13th, 2008, 9:17 pm
Location: Kuiper Belt

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby eishiya » June 17th, 2011, 5:47 pm

stripedwine wrote:PS- I would totally wear a costume if I had a table. Time to reinvent the definition of "booth babe".

If you wear a costume, stand. No one will see it otherwise. Plus, standing/moving a bit attracts people, from what I hear. I haven't tried it.

But, avoid having a separate booth babe, or too many people at your table in general. As xkrazy mentioned, people are timid, and if there are too many people, they'll skip your table. When people come talk to you (friends, non-buyers, whatever), try to get them to leave quickly, for the same reason.
Image
User avatar
eishiya
 
Posts: 9487
Joined: December 5th, 2009, 11:17 am

Re: Artist Alley and Convention Tabling!

Postby stripedwine » June 17th, 2011, 6:30 pm

eishiya wrote:
stripedwine wrote:PS- I would totally wear a costume if I had a table. Time to reinvent the definition of "booth babe".

If you wear a costume, stand. No one will see it otherwise. Plus, standing/moving a bit attracts people, from what I hear. I haven't tried it.

But, avoid having a separate booth babe, or too many people at your table in general. As xkrazy mentioned, people are timid, and if there are too many people, they'll skip your table. When people come talk to you (friends, non-buyers, whatever), try to get them to leave quickly, for the same reason.


There's no sitting in the costumes I make.

Also, I'm kind of the exact opposite. I hate approaching tables with no one looking at the stuff, and with only one lonely person sitting behind it. It's more eye contact, more pressure, more trying to get me to buy stuff and harder to walk away. If there's no one there, I'm more likely to glance at the table from the middle/other side of the aisle than go up and peruse. Besides, if the booth is crowded, I'm going to want to see what the fuss is all about.
Image
(Especially likes the gay robot porn.)

Image

I left my ♥ in Vancouver.
User avatar
stripedwine
 
Posts: 2154
Joined: January 13th, 2008, 9:17 pm
Location: Kuiper Belt

Next

Return to The Business of Comics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

cron