The Official Game Development Thread

Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby Captain Ghost » November 6th, 2018, 12:39 am

Little fox looks to be having fun in the water! It's a very cute gif and the water effect looks really nice!
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby eishiya » November 6th, 2018, 8:15 am

Thanks :D

I've now run out of [things I need to do before I can build the maps], which means I have to actually do game design now, and that's where my projects die 8D
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby IDONTKNOWCORP » December 9th, 2018, 10:14 pm

eishiya wrote:Water \o/
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I vaguely recall sketching some water tiles because I didn't think I would be able to code dynamic water. They looked like crap, and I'm glad I don't have to animate water by hand :'D


Sorry if you've already posted about this (I quickly scrolled through the thread but admittedly not super thoroughly), what platform/program are you making this with? It looks lovely
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby eishiya » December 9th, 2018, 10:48 pm

IDONTKNOWCORP wrote:
eishiya wrote:Water \o/
https://i.imgur.com/MIKqdRM.gif

I vaguely recall sketching some water tiles because I didn't think I would be able to code dynamic water. They looked like crap, and I'm glad I don't have to animate water by hand :'D


Sorry if you've already posted about this (I quickly scrolled through the thread but admittedly not super thoroughly), what platform/program are you making this with? It looks lovely

Thank you! It's a custom engine, using SFML for all the low-level stuff (rendering, sound, window management, etc).
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby IDONTKNOWCORP » December 10th, 2018, 12:31 am

Oh heck that's even more impressive.

Is that the route you'd recommend for simple 2D game production? I've tried game maker in the past and remember it being a bit clunky and limiting. Currently playing around with Unity but it's got a bit of a learning curve I'm finding.
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby eishiya » December 10th, 2018, 10:05 am

IDONTKNOWCORP wrote:Oh heck that's even more impressive.

Is that the route you'd recommend for simple 2D game production? I've tried game maker in the past and remember it being a bit clunky and limiting. Currently playing around with Unity but it's got a bit of a learning curve I'm finding.

The main reason I wrote my own engine is that existing engines break my brain xP It's not a route I'd recommend unless writing an engine sounds like fun to you. It's very time-consuming, and at least early on, most of your time is spent reinventing the wheel (but making it just how you like it) rather than making your game.

If you want to make a simple 2D game and not take two years to make it, definitely use an existing engine.
I haven't tried Game Maker myself, but it seems like a very good fit for 2D games. it's a very powerful engine, but you will have to do coding to get past the limitations. That's the case in most engines though. GUI-based systems for designing game logic and rendering are nice, but for many things, code is much more efficient. The first thing I look for in an engine is how easy it is to jump in and code things when I need to. GM does have some clunk, but based on my limited experience, it seems like the same sort of clunk you'd get in Unity and Unreal and just about any engine if you're not going in code-first and not relying on pre-built assets.

If you're not particularly attached to any engine, maybe give Godot a try? It's a relatively new engine, and it's free. Having not used it myself, I can't say how it compares to others, but I've seen neat (2D) stuff made in it, and those games' creators sing its praises, including people who only recently started using it.

There are also engines out there that are much narrower in scope, those tend to have less clutter getting in your way, perhaps that might be something you'd like? For example, Ren'py is a VN engine and because that's all it does, there's very little clunk, every tool and bit of UI will probably prove useful. There are likely similar engines for other types of games or broad categories. I recently found Tilengine, designed for SNES-esque tile-based games, that one seems great if you like to code since it's more of a library you plug into your code, it's not a big graphical editor like the popular engines. Incidentally, my own "engine" is the same way - it's a bunch of code I can use, it's not a thing you "launch".
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby IDONTKNOWCORP » December 10th, 2018, 11:29 pm

eishiya wrote:
IDONTKNOWCORP wrote:Oh heck that's even more impressive.

Is that the route you'd recommend for simple 2D game production? I've tried game maker in the past and remember it being a bit clunky and limiting. Currently playing around with Unity but it's got a bit of a learning curve I'm finding.

The main reason I wrote my own engine is that existing engines break my brain xP It's not a route I'd recommend unless writing an engine sounds like fun to you. It's very time-consuming, and at least early on, most of your time is spent reinventing the wheel (but making it just how you like it) rather than making your game.

If you want to make a simple 2D game and not take two years to make it, definitely use an existing engine.
I haven't tried Game Maker myself, but it seems like a very good fit for 2D games. it's a very powerful engine, but you will have to do coding to get past the limitations. That's the case in most engines though. GUI-based systems for designing game logic and rendering are nice, but for many things, code is much more efficient. The first thing I look for in an engine is how easy it is to jump in and code things when I need to. GM does have some clunk, but based on my limited experience, it seems like the same sort of clunk you'd get in Unity and Unreal and just about any engine if you're not going in code-first and not relying on pre-built assets.

If you're not particularly attached to any engine, maybe give Godot a try? It's a relatively new engine, and it's free. Having not used it myself, I can't say how it compares to others, but I've seen neat (2D) stuff made in it, and those games' creators sing its praises, including people who only recently started using it.

There are also engines out there that are much narrower in scope, those tend to have less clutter getting in your way, perhaps that might be something you'd like? For example, Ren'py is a VN engine and because that's all it does, there's very little clunk, every tool and bit of UI will probably prove useful. There are likely similar engines for other types of games or broad categories. I recently found Tilengine, designed for SNES-esque tile-based games, that one seems great if you like to code since it's more of a library you plug into your code, it's not a big graphical editor like the popular engines. Incidentally, my own "engine" is the same way - it's a bunch of code I can use, it's not a thing you "launch".


Thanks for the breakdown! I'm not above coding (it's been a minute, but it's not the biggest hurdle to get back in the mindset), I was mostly aiming to avoid building an engine from the bottom up >.<

I've looked at Godot but I'm gonna give unity a bit longer before I jump ship
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Re: The Official Game Development Thread

Postby redandblack64 » August 24th, 2019, 4:36 pm

Progress I've made on a prototype of an HD 2D platformer. Right after finishing at RMCAD, I made the decision to code for 1 hour a day at minimum. This is what I have so far after 3 months of learning C# and Godot's GDScript. I'm planning on a vertical slice of the game that has both this character, SKye (uses long/mid range weapons), and Kimi (uses short ranged attacks with swords of various types). Kimi's character controller is the next thing to tackle, but should be far easier and faster to implement since I finally understand functions, signals and state machines. Now to circle around and fix up and polish some things. Then learn how to do things like pause menus, dialogue cutscenes and basic inventory (or relearn inventory because we rushed through that in a class about 2 years ago in Unreal 4).

Godot is amazing, it makes the most sense to a me and feels far less clunky than Game Maker or as limited as Construct. Easiest engine for noob programmers to play around with signals, for sure.
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