Starting big, rather than starting small?

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Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby SketchLines » May 1st, 2019, 5:56 am

Okay, so I know that the golden rule of webcomic making is to start off small, then work on something big; but what if that the thing that you've been working on - that was previously something small - became something that you started falling in love with and now are focused on making that comic instead of your 'next big thing'?

My comic, A Wizard and a Cat, was a comic that was supposed to be... let's say a 'bombing test site'. It was supposed to be the cess pit of my failures and things so I can move on and learn from those mistakes, not to repeat them again and to make sure that my next comic project doesn't end up as warped as that. However, the thing is... I've honestly fallen in love with the concept of this comic that I'm willing to work on this far more than my 'next big thing'! It's kind of ironic, really!

I love the characters, I love the setting, I love the fact that it's so amateur, anyone can do it. The thing is, though, I am fully knowledgeable about all the flaws that the comic offers within the first Chapter. It has no flow, no writing involved and it's so evident upon reading the first two chapters, where everything was not planned and written beforehand, making every single scene drag on and on.

I know I'm shooting myself in the foot with this one, but is there anyone out there with a sort of... success story about their first comic doing kinda well? Again, I know I shouldn't be dedicating my time to A Wizard and a Cat as much as I am, but... there's just something about it, man. I love it. It has the flaws that any beginner should have, and is something I should throw under the bus the moment I learn from my mistakes. But the flaws are kinda endearing to me in a way?

What do you guys think? Should I keep working on it? Or should I, if I care about it so much, delete it and start from scratch, really build up the story and then publish it? I'm kind of at a loss honestly! I never thought that something, that was supposed to be expendable, mind you, became something so close to my heart! Again, it's so ironic!

I'd love to hear some feedback!
My comic, A Wizard and A Cat :) http://awac.smackjeeves.com/
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby eishiya » May 1st, 2019, 7:37 am

Success in webcomics, first, second, or even third, is often not something so major that it's worth worrying about. As I said in your other thread: if you're enjoying it, keep doing it!

Some people do succeed with their very first webcomic, either through being good and popular from the start due to prior non-webcomic work, or through persevering until they get better and/or the comic finds its audience. It's not necessarily "wasted" in that regard. But, more importantly, even if the first comic doesn't ever get many readers, it's still worth doing, because it's something you enjoy and because it'll help your next comic be even better! There's nothing that'll make you better at comics than doing comics.
Also, some people don't find success even with their 10th comic. There are no guarantees, and webcomic success has at least as much to do with factors external to the comic as it does with the quality of the comic itself - advertising, social media presense, that sort of stuff. Unless you have to make your webcomic your job, don't worry so much about success.

If you really want to devote more time to this one instead of just firing ahead, then take a break from it to write out the story. No need to restart, work from where you are now. After that break, you'll have less work to do for each update since it'll all be written, and you'll know where you're headed, so you can just keep updating! That said, just because you have a full script doesn't mean you shouldn't keep fiddling with it as you go ;D In webcomics, I find it more useful to have a goal and an outline than a script, since we get better as we go at writing too!
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby Spikings » May 1st, 2019, 10:17 am

My first webcomic APOC( http://www.apoccomic.com ), is a huge story. It's going to take years to finish, but I love the characters and development so much that "starting off small" would just kill my joy for webcomics. Why start on another project for 'practice' when the epic saga is what gets you to open up your art program and get drawing? :P

I used to treat APOC as a precious fragile thing, but nowadays if I make small mistakes in the story or art, it's more of a testament to how far I've come between page 1 and the latest one I'm on. It's a journey for the characters, and a journey for me too. ^_^

That being said, I get why the "start small" advice is popular. It stops new creators from burning out on huge projects. But If you've been on the comic for a while and you still have plenty more fuel, then why switch to something smaller?Make what you love the most. If you want to test the waters with new ideas, make a mini-comic on the side that's less precious, let it come and go as you please. Then take what you learned from there and pool it back into your Big Epic.
Sorry for the ramble, but tl;dr I agree with starting big sometimes!!
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby Gibson Twist » May 1st, 2019, 12:02 pm

Throw away the idea of success, which I think is what Eishiya was also saying. Doing a comic at any point based on the idea of whether it will succeed or not is a pitfall and it'll sink you. Comics are something you have to do for the satisfaction you get from making it or the commitment to telling the story. If you're in love with this story, make that story, just be prepared for the day you fall out of love with it because that will 100% happen. The reasoning behind making short work before you do big work isn't a rule, and many of the same problems exist with big works whether it's your first or after many years, but having experience under your belt and developing your skills a little will ensure you don't hate those first pages when you're a couple years in.

Another thing that doesn't get said much is that everyone loves their creative ideas when they first get them, like relationships that are exciting at first but when you get into them, they don't seem so shiny and don't give you what you need. My suggestion is to sit on the big thing you love, get to know it a little better, and see if you still love it in six months or a year. If it sticks with you, then get into it. If it fades in your brain, you've saved yourself a lot of time and issues. Another good idea is to write it all out in plot beforehand, write say 100 pages of finished script, thumbnail 50 pages, pencil 25, ink 12, colour/letter 6 and see if you stay invested through it all. That will also give you an idea of how long of an investment the story's going to be.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby calmcnichols » May 1st, 2019, 1:08 pm

I mentioned this in your other topic, but the best advice I can stumble out is just do what you enjoy even if it is at odds with 'the norm'. almost always, what you really enjoy is something you are also good at. only you know what you can or cannot handle, and if you don't know where that line is, then just try something and find out. I agree with gibson and eishiya though that success should really not be a motivation and so many circumstances are out of your control anyway. finding something you like and doing it will give you much better results and resolve than the dice roll of success. For some, doing their hobby with a set repetitive schedule can kill the joy it brings but only you know if that is one of these situations for you.

going on the end of gibson's post, planning out a huge chunk at once can definitely help to see if you got the juice for such a big project can really help some people, but many other people also don't work that way. akira toriyama of DBZ fame was extremely prolific but I know for a fact that man barely plotted out anything. part of it was the industry he was in but that's just how he worked and it worked well for him. who knows, maybe you find that you real joy comes from plotting out extensively and being a manager of others rather than a one-man band? only you know. just find what you like and pursue that, it really will give you more motivation than any other arbitrary rules in my opinion. I don't think any time is ever wasted in that regard.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby SketchLines » May 2nd, 2019, 6:04 am

Wow! These are all amazing responses! I didn't think I would honestly get such helpful advice from a wide variety of views and people with different experiences! I honestly thank you all so much!

Eishiya

eishiya wrote:Success in webcomics, first, second, or even third, is often not something so major that it's worth worrying about. As I said in your other thread: if you're enjoying it, keep doing it!


Ah yes! I'm sorry I haven't gotten to my previous thread. I started reading the responses from this one first. But I really am enjoying AWAC so far :) I think I will continue it.

eishiya wrote:Some people do succeed with their very first webcomic, either through being good and popular from the start due to prior non-webcomic work, or through persevering until they get better and/or the comic finds its audience. It's not necessarily "wasted" in that regard.


Definitely something to think about for me :) I'm going to keep pushing on.

eishiya wrote:Also, some people don't find success even with their 10th comic. There are no guarantees, and webcomic success has at least as much to do with factors external to the comic as it does with the quality of the comic itself - advertising, social media presense, that sort of stuff. Unless you have to make your webcomic your job, don't worry so much about success.


Ah, I'm so sorry that I misused the word "success".

I think what I should've said, in the beginning, was something akin to like "having an average amount of viewers that returns. What can I do to make it interesting?" or something akin to that... Oops :X. Or maybe that's what I meant? I really don't know. I guess I was just afraid that my first - well, second - comic would go nowhere. But I'm starting to find confidence in finished AWAC, especially with all of the responses from a huge variety of people both in Smackjeeves and Tapastic!

eishiya wrote:If you really want to devote more time to this one instead of just firing ahead, then take a break from it to write out the story. No need to restart, work from where you are now. After that break, you'll have less work to do for each update since it'll all be written, and you'll know where you're headed, so you can just keep updating! That said, just because you have a full script doesn't mean you shouldn't keep fiddling with it as you go ;D In webcomics, I find it more useful to have a goal and an outline than a script since we get better as we go at writing too!


Yeah :) I think i might devote some more time to writing, as I have already. I think I really shouldn't reboot it unless I had a damn good reason to do so now.

Spikings

Spikings wrote:My first webcomic APOC( http://www.apoccomic.com ), is a huge story. It's going to take years to finish, but I love the characters and development so much that "starting off small" would just kill my joy for webcomics. Why start on another project for 'practice' when the epic saga is what gets you to open up your art program and get drawing? :P


Oh wow! Your first webcomic and I assume it's still going? That's one hell of an archive of pages! That's impressive to keep up a work for that long!

You're right on the regard of using the project for practice too. I've been starting to get told the same thing, basically, from a lot of people of all sorts of viewpoints and perspectives and experiences!

Spikings wrote:I used to treat APOC as a precious fragile thing, but nowadays if I make small mistakes in the story or art, it's more of a testament to how far I've come between page 1 and the latest one I'm on. It's a journey for the characters, and a journey for me too. ^_^


That's an interesting way to view errors and mistakes! It's kind of like what Gibson said and some people on even Tapastic told me :) Even if there's a mistake you want to erase, you're going to have to keep moving forward, because even in big projects with experienced people, there are still errors!

Spikings wrote:That being said, I get why the "start small" advice is popular. It stops new creators from burning out on huge projects. But If you've been on the comic for a while and you still have plenty more fuel, then why switch to something smaller? Make what you love the most. If you want to test the waters with new ideas, make a mini-comic on the side that's less precious, let it come and go as you please. Then take what you learned from there and pool it back into your Big Epic.
Sorry for the ramble, but tl;dr I agree with starting big sometimes!!


Yeah, I'd hate to switch to something smaller. To be honest, I've already started working on smaller projects - much smaller than AWAC - and I got burnt out on THOSE projects vs AWAC! What irony! Yeah, I'm going to take what I've learned from AWAC and use it for my next BIG project. Going small's a little boring; well, to me at least. ;)

And no problem for the ramble :) It was more than helpful and solidified what a lot of people have told me! I really do love the ramble!~

Gibson Twist
Gibson Twist wrote:Throw away the idea of success, which I think is what Eishiya was also saying. Doing a comic at any point based on the idea of whether it will succeed or not is a pitfall and it'll sink you.


Definitely, the hardest thing to read, but definitely one of the most important for me to understand.

Gibson Twist wrote:Comics are something you have to do for the satisfaction you get from making it or the commitment to telling the story. If you're in love with this story, make that story, just be prepared for the day you fall out of love with it because that will 100% happen.


Definitely, a hard punch to read, but again important. I do love AWAC and I do want to tell and complete its story, but what scares me is the concept of 'falling out of love with it'. As much as I may fall out of love with AWAC, I hope I honestly don't.

I have this even older comic, Stale. TOTAL garbage fire! Don't recommend you read it, at all. However, I picked it back up and read it. Every single page hurt my heart and stomach to read. My eyes widened in disbelief and closed shut - tight - during some scenes! I flailed my arms about like some chicken with its head cut off!

However, despite all of the flaws that that comic had, I still have love for it. Like, there was something to it, man. Something that I could only make during that time of my life. It had this amateur-ness to it (obviously), but it also had heart. The art was a bit off, but it seemed like - at the time - that I tried. I also believe that when I was working on it, I was self-aware of how edgy and bad it was! Some of the scenes and even the covers of some chapters parodied itself! It was effin' brilliant... in an odd sort of way.

I honestly, I kind of wish I never stopped it. I wish I completed it! It may be realistic to fall out of love with an idea or work you did, but I hope - personally - that I don't. If it's true, and it is more than certain it will happen, then I'd like to stay a child - just for a bit longer. :) And I really hope to see AWAC in the same light, someday when I'm finished with it.

Gibson Twist wrote:The reasoning behind making short work before you do big work isn't a rule, and many of the same problems exist with big works whether it's your first or after many years, but having experience under your belt and developing your skills a little will ensure you don't hate those first pages when you're a couple of years in.


Hm, it does bring me some relief, knowing that even with more experienced people, mistakes are bound to happen. That translates, to me anyway, that I should continue, because I'm not gonna learn by looking up videos (well, I might learn a few things here and there). I was always more of a 'hands-on' sort of guy, you know? So thanks for that :) I do imagine you've got a lot of experience under your belt, as evidenced from the response, and am loving responding to it (not to play favorites! :x sorry everyone...).

Gibson Twist wrote:Another thing that doesn't get said much is that everyone loves their creative ideas when they first get them, like relationships that are exciting at first but when you get into them, they don't seem so shiny and don't give you what you need.


I actually know that feeling quite well! Again, with Stale it was something that was super cool to me at the time! A comic that could have only been made at that current state of mind; at that current time in my life. There's no way I could be able to make the same thing again - at least I don't think (definitely am going to go back to Stale to give it the proper finish it needs, because I'm just that naive ;) )

However, the more I worked on it, the more I started getting burnt out on the whole "depression" thing. As my life started getting, well, not better but more... manageable, I started viewing the comic in a different light. What was once my go to for stress relief was now the number one cause of the stress! I had to release pages for a thing I no longer wanted to create! It was horrible!

I certainly hope that doesn't happen with AWAC, but I won't know until I truck on. So I'll keep trucking on!

Gibson Twist wrote:My suggestion is to sit on the big thing you love, get to know it a little better, and see if you still love it in six months or a year. If it sticks with you, then get into it. If it fades in your brain, you've saved yourself a lot of time and issues.


Yeah, unfortunately, I'm a bit lazy for that :( But I'll have to take this advice to heart. I've heard it a thousand times and there's a reason why it's been told a thousand times. If there wasn't any merit to it, it wouldn't be repeated.

Gibson Twist wrote:Another good idea is to write it all out in plot beforehand, write say 100 pages of finished script, thumbnail 50 pages, pencil 25, ink 12, colour/letter 6 and see if you stay invested through it all. That will also give you an idea of how long of an investment the story's going to be.


Oh! A nice idea! Gonna have to write this down :) Noted!

And thank you so much for your input, I really do appreciate it. Was a tough read, but again a very, very interesting one. One that opposed my 'happy go merry' way of thinking and viewing things. I think this is something I needed to read and take to heart. Thanks :)

calmcnichols

calmcnichols wrote:I mentioned this in your other topic


So sorry for not responding to the previous topic first! I viewed these responses first, so I'm going to do my best to properly respond to all of you! Because honestly I really do think that all of you helped me out tremendously. Even if it didn't completely answer my question (which it shouldn't) it gave me insight to a much bigger picture that I didn't even know I was looking at!

calmcnichols wrote:, but the best advice I can stumble out is just do what you enjoy even if it is at odds with 'the norm'. almost always, what you really enjoy is something you are also good at. only you know what you can or cannot handle, and if you don't know where that line is, then just try something and find out.


Oh boy, do I love going against the norm! In a sea of BL's, love stories and LGBT comics, I love being the one pimple - or shit stain, rather - on the face of the webcomic community that doesn't take the comic that direction. I know there are amazing comics out there that don't do that stuff either, or if they do, it's just part of the comic and not the whole point of it, but I feel pretty good not making another love story with an abusive asshole of a guy and an idiot of a girl.

calmcnichols wrote:I agree with gibson and eishiya though that success should really not be a motivation and so many circumstances are out of your control anyway. finding something you like and doing it will give you much better results and resolve than the dice roll of success. For some, doing their hobby with a set repetitive schedule can kill the joy it brings but only you know if that is one of these situations for you.


Yeah... doing the whole repetitive schedule thing does kill the joy a bit for me, at the start anyway. But like you said, 'only you know if that is one of these situations for you'! I started clinging onto these schedules, so to speak! Without them, I have no idea what's happening in my comic! I get anxious! It's quite odd.

But yeah, I agree with Gibson and Eishiya too, the thing about success.

Motivation. Yeah, I shouldn't work on my comic when I'm motivated. Say that i'm never motivated to work on it, then what? It's like, I still want to do it, but i'm not 'inspired' enough. I want to tell AWAC's story, but i'm not 'motivated' enough. You're 100 percent damn right on that one! Or maybe I took what you said wrong? But either way, it's inspiring to me, the way I took it.

And I do love the idea of finding something that I like and having the dice choose whether or not I'll be successful. I'm a bit of a gambler myself, so I'll roll the dice as many times as it takes, baby!

calmcnichols wrote:going on the end of gibson's post, planning out a huge chunk at once can definitely help to see if you got the juice for such a big project can really help some people, but many other people also don't work that way. akira toriyama of DBZ fame was extremely prolific but I know for a fact that man barely plotted out anything. part of it was the industry he was in but that's just how he worked and it worked well for him.


Yeah, Akira Toriyama! Even though I'm not a fan of DBZ myself, what he's done and the impact he's created on the face of anime is not to be scoffed at. Even if he did bring in a lot of the 'suitings' (for lack of a better word) for manga and anime, it also brought in the failures and errors of DBZ. But what he did is not to be scoffed at. It truly was his prolific workstyle and the time being and knowing what market he was in that made DBZ what it is.

calmcnichols wrote:who knows, maybe you find that you real joy comes from plotting out extensively and being a manager of others rather than a one-man band? only you know. just find what you like and pursue that, it really will give you more motivation than any other arbitrary rules in my opinion. I don't think any time is ever wasted in that regard.


Hm, I don't know if i'm at that stage to have a team of workers with me, working on A Wizard and a Cat. To be honest, I don't know if people would want to work on it anyhow XD! But I also don't want to be held back by arbitrary rules either.

My error, from before, was saying that 'starting small first' was a rule. It was not a rule, as many have told me. However, I still think that even though that was corrected, I still think that maybe I don't want to start small. And i've been convinced by a good number of people already from forum responses to keep doing what i'm doing!


Summary!

Honestly, thank you all so much for your inputs! I really do effin' appreciate it, can't say it enough without sounding stock-ish, you know? Like a stock response. But everyone did actually make a huge impact on not only my confidence (in a positive manner), but a huge impact on my thinking and viewing of my comic as a whole! My perspective's challenged now, something that needs to happen and needs to be done, so I can see things change.

Thank you all. I really do mean it! Much love!
My comic, A Wizard and A Cat :) http://awac.smackjeeves.com/
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby Gibson Twist » May 2nd, 2019, 9:06 am

I should clarify that falling out of love with a project doesn't mean you won't fall back IN love with it, and possibly fall out and in love several times. Part of it is knowing you may have to push through and produce pages for something when you don't like it and don't want to do it. I can't even tell you how many pages I've been absolutely miserable while making and just wanted to strip down and run flailing into the forest, but it's in the hundreds for sure. I suspect anyone who's ever worked on a big, long project will agree that's part of the process. Truth be told, I don't think it's something we can prepare ourselves for by doing smaller projects first, but at least with smaller projects you get a more immediate sense of completion, and that's important.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby SketchLines » May 2nd, 2019, 11:59 am

Gibson Twist wrote:I should clarify that falling out of love with a project doesn't mean you won't fall back IN love with it, and possibly fall out and in love several times. Part of it is knowing you may have to push through and produce pages for something when you don't like it and don't want to do it. I can't even tell you how many pages I've been absolutely miserable while making and just wanted to strip down and run flailing into the forest, but it's in the hundreds for sure. I suspect anyone who's ever worked on a big, long project will agree that's part of the process. Truth be told, I don't think it's something we can prepare ourselves for by doing smaller projects first, but at least with smaller projects you get a more immediate sense of completion, and that's important.


Oh! My apologies! I didn't mean to assume that you didn't do the same or meant the same. Terribly sorry for that on my end.

My condolences, by the way, with the frustration of making something you no longer wanted to work on (I assume). I kind of felt the same way with Stale, a comic that took two years of my life. But knowing you, that was probably much, much longer and more grueling, given that you're probably a prolific comic creator.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby mitchellbravo » May 2nd, 2019, 8:15 pm

Throwing in my 2 cents for doing what you're moved to do now rather than deliberately undercutting yourself lest the project get bigger than you could have hoped.


I started putting my comic online 10 years ago, though it had been developing before that. Back then I still wasn't totally sure about the direction I wanted to take it- or maybe I was, but just grew out of wanting it like that. What I did, which I really don't recommend to someone starting out barring extreme circumstances, is when I started to realize just how off course I was shifting, I cut the first chapter of the comic that was no longer relevant to the rest. Years later I repeated the process, cutting off what was at that time also the first chapter, which the rest of the comic had outgrown. All told this was like 60-80 pages or something absurd. But I did this without going back to redraw or redo those pages and was still putting out new material. I'll be coming up on 300 pages in a few weeks though it's taken a very long time to get there.


Point is, I didn't have my whole comic scripted out, and I still don't. I also didn't start this hobby specifically to get better at drawing pr comic making, or really for any other purpose than I had a story I wanted to tell and I enjoyed drawing. I had dreams back in the beginning of "making it big," which I think everyone does. As the years passed I settled for dreaming of making a few dollars a month through ads or whatever, but that too is something I've dropped as a motivator. I also had a hiatus sprinkled with intermittent updates the past like, 4 years I guess it's been. What Gibson Twist mentioned about falling out of love with a story happened big time to me. I'm blessed in that whatever "it" was has for now come back to me and I'm back to writing and drawing and enjoying myself again.

I'm mostly rambling now, but I just am thinking of something the priest said at my grandfather's funeral- he wasn't a guy who did big things, but he did small things with a lot of love. I think "big" is what you make of it, and the best project is the one you actually get around to making. Webcomics as a medium are extremely flexible and you can always have a fresh start if the commitment to a large project is holding you back- it's not like a novel where it's got to be finished in one go, or a print run where whatever's been printed is set in stone and can't be altered. You have a lot of freedom and you have a unique opportunity to do exactly what you want to do without having to worry about what someone paying you thinks.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby Gibson Twist » May 3rd, 2019, 2:01 am

mitchellbravo wrote:I think "big" is what you make of it, and the best project is the one you actually get around to making.


This is a solid-ass point. One can make a great big body of work out of several smaller, more achievable projects that won't destroy you from the inside.
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Re: Starting big, rather than starting small?

Postby artofjoe » May 8th, 2019, 2:24 pm

SketchLines wrote: I never thought that something, that was supposed to be expendable, mind you, became something so close to my heart! Again, it's so ironic!

I'd love to hear some feedback!

Yooooo, Sketchlines! :D Bro, I can relate to this statement right here. For me, that was my webcomic "Charming" I wouldn't call what I have right
now a huge success story, but I'm gradually getting closer and I am committed to get that high score.

It started out as kind of a throwaway concept that I just didn't care about, I'd originally planned to make this sort of fairy tale parody of the avengers where you have a huge cast of classic fairy tale characters with fun twists fight various fairy land villains. When I started writing it though, I just lost interest after a day. I wrote the beginning of the Frog Prince's backstory and Prince Charming's backstory. I went all out in the Prince Charming backstory and all of the sudden I decided that he actually had a pretty good backstory. It was cute, a little tragic, and the people I showed it to said it was funny. I wasn't really sure where to go after the prologue, so I just posted that on smackjeeves to see if anyone else thought it was a good idea. One of the fans from my other comic gave it a read and told me I HAD to keep going. I had kinda dropped it and had moved on, but after I finished some projects I did finally go back
The art was bad, the formatting was bad, the font was bad. It was a lot of bad. But man, oh man... It was loveable.
I didn't stop. I just had fun. I focused on the humor and whenever I could I wrote some of it until I could get a good buffer. I was still writing other books at the time and I used Charming as a playground to try out new skills and to test things. eventually I had a higher fan count on that one than my others and I didn't even have any idea what I wanted to do with it. Since it was my test comic, I had absolutely no problem with anybody telling me whether it was absolute garbage or not, so I submitted it to quite a few people for reviews. And here is what I learned from that.

These critics loved my story, to the point of following it, even though the art was pretty bad.

That right there was all I needed to know. I knew my comic had what it took to be successful as long as I kept improving my skills, so I took art classes and watched so many YouTube videos (better than art school, it's free and you can learn literally anything). I took those critiques I'd received and worked until I could turn every negative into a positive. And once I decided I was ready, I started re-drawing all the old stuff. That's kinda the stage I'm at right now. I'm hoping to have basically most of it redrawn and even colored by the end of the year (hopefully most of it by the end of the summer). I'm still learning, and I have a little below 30 fans, but that number keeps increasing with each improvement I make.
Again, I'm no champion yet, but I'll keep on fighting til the end.

My feedback to you right now would be to just keep writing it, it doesn't matter if your art is bad or if you have success now or later. Write it as a hobby and keep using it as a playground to learn new skills and practice with it, and then one day when you think you've got a handle on it, redo it and make it again, but the way you always wished it could be.
No one is going to complain if you make something better than it was. Redoing something is kind of a scary concept to consider, but eventually if you keep improving a time is going to come where you'll look back at some old stuff and say to yourself,"I could do so much better now than I could before." And it will be fun. From personal experience, redoing it is actually a lot of fun. Especially having two different versions of the same story to compare, that's way fun.
Starting big or starting small probably doesn't matter. Just do what you can do now and the future you can fix your mistakes if they want to.
Good luck, bro! I've read some of your stuff and I could definitely see you improving on and eventually creating a really awesome unique style. It's also kind of a throwback to stickfigures, which is something I enjoy. If there's ever something I can do to help you out on the site, give me a shout.
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artofjoe
 
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