READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby eishiya » April 8th, 2013, 4:25 pm

Randumbz wrote:So what do you do if nobody replys to your thread?

Wait until it gets pushed off the first page (or to the bottom of the first page, if it's a particularly slow period), then bump it. But, before you bump, make sure your OP is up-to-date and as well-written and informative as possible. There's no sense bumping an ineffective thread.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby Super Sachiko » April 26th, 2013, 3:23 pm

aaaaarrrgh i am getting so annoyed with all the people (on multiple sites) that i keep seeing, who automatically assume people will be interested in their story. they barely give out any info, then they say "message me if you are interested." how is anyone supposed to be interested in something that they know nothing about?!!

can people please start revealing:

-the genres/mood of their story
-the style of art they are looking for, and whether they want digital or traditional
-the length of the manga, and length of chapters/volumes
-probably the most important thing, yet a lot of people don't mention it: whether the story has sexual content, gore, yaoi/yuri, fetishes, religion, politics, sensitive/controversial topics... anything that might make someone uncomfortable.
-the other most important thing: a summary of the story.
-whether or not this manga will be uploaded for free online, self-published and sold, printed, ebook, what?
-right-to-left or left-to-right?
-timeline/deadlines

these things need to be clearly laid out so that people know what they're getting into and not waste their time sending a message just to later find out that the story contains something they dislike or can't do!!! i'm tired of people being vague!!
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby eishiya » April 26th, 2013, 3:33 pm

Super Sachiko wrote:-the style of art they are looking for, and whether they want digital or traditional
-whether or not this manga will be uploaded for free online, self-published and sold, printed, ebook, what?
-timeline/deadlines

For these three things, the person usually has no preference or hasn't thought about it, so they don't think to mention it. However, it's best to specifically state whether you have no preference than to leave it open-ended, so it's good that you mentioned them.

Also, L-R versus R-L: It's safe to assume L-R just like it's safe to assume that the comic will be in English if the post is in English; R-L is a niche thing and most people who would prefer to make an R-L comic typically state so.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby sanspants » August 26th, 2013, 12:06 pm

As a writer, before I see who's available for collaboration, I try to have the following ready to hand out:

A world building document. You need something that spells out a basic recent history of your world if it's an alternate world, or something that spells out the differences if you're dealing in 'zero world' (AKA: modern Earth). This document should give focus to the immediate area that the story is set in, along with pertinent information about the environs. This is not a suggestion to write three thousand years of history for the Kingdom of Buttsylvania when your story focuses on Crackstown. The history's nice (and will inevitably come up later) but to hit the ground running, you and your artist need to have all the details for Crackstown nailed out.

A character document. Who are your main characters? Who are your immediate villains? How do they interact? I highly suggest finding a template for character creation that will work for you. Sometimes, I use a relevant tabletop roleplaying game character sheet, so I can ensure there's some balance between everyone for things like skills and combat. I am also a nerd, though, so your mileage may vary.

Ten pages of script, that go from a start to something resembling an end. This way, your potential artist can see how you write and you two can work out how you deliver said scripts. From what I've seen, artists either like:

[*]Novelization - apparently some people like that sort of thing, where the artist has maximum control over pacing and page count.
[*]Comic format - this is full-on stuff that you see in all the "How to Write Comics" books and web pages. The writer's taking over a LOT of the direction and tone here, but it's also what the 'real' comic authors do, so... I guess I'd consider it "hardmode".
[*]Screenplay - this is kind of a mix of the two, where you write like it's going to be a TV show. This lets you focus on the dialogue and actions and lets the artist handle everything art. As you can tell, this one is my preferred method, for purely selfish reasons. I just really like the format. ;)

I'd love to hear other specifics that artists would like to have (or stuff they deem unnecessary) for a collab, though, as this is just from a writer who's kind of serious about it.
Writer. Game designer.

There are no happy endings, because the story never ends.

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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby Geniusguy445 » February 27th, 2014, 2:59 pm

I'm attempting to create a collaboration comic to more easily connect people who would work well together.

I made a thread about it, and I'm currently drafting up the requirements for participating parties. Thanks to this thread, requirements will be more detailed and useful.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby CACKLE'N-COMICS » June 1st, 2014, 10:35 am

Good Points OP; Alot of ppl want to steal artists AND their time!
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby eishiya » September 26th, 2014, 9:11 am

I just noticed the first page discourages people from posting their ending. Personally, I disagree with that, for two reasons:

1. As a theft-prevention measure, that's just silly. If someone manages to "steal" a story and produce it with just the description you provide, they deserve it because they did all that work, and because with how many gaps they'd have to fill, it's very likely going to be a very different story from the one you'd create! Ideas are a dime a dozen, don't value them so highly, don't be afraid to share them. By all means, keep your worldbuilding documents and scripts private between you and your collaborators, but don't be afraid to share the general ideas.

2. As an artist, I want to know that the writer has a good idea of the ending, and "I have the ending planned" is not good enough. I want to know what sort of ending it is, since that'll give me a better idea of the story's likely tone than any other possible description, and seeing that the author is able to summarise their ending tells me that they've probably given their story a good amount of planning. I don't need to know the details of the ending or how they get there, of course. I just want the gist, e.g. "With some casualties, the team makes it to home, but their superiors are so ashamed of the event that kicked the story off that they order a cover-up, forcing them to flee back to the land they escaped."
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby Driftline » July 27th, 2016, 1:30 pm

Thank you all for this information.

This information helps immensely when looking for an illustrator. It shows the necessity of being thorough as possible. The honest truth is both the writer and the illustrator can be completely clueless on how things work. As a result, a lot of things come off as unprofessional from one or the other party. While a lot of things can happen that appear that one party is deliberately misusing a person's trust or being unprofessional, a lot of times it can also be one or both parties slipped up or made a mistake they weren't aware is a big deal.

The most important thing is communication. That's what it's all about. Knowing definitely what you do want and what you don't want is important. Just settle down to know how you want things before getting into it.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby Driftline » July 29th, 2016, 9:17 am

I have worked with many illustrators in the past. I've had less than satisfactory experiences. Some of them arose from a problem on my end. Some of them arose from a problem on the illustrator's end.

Examples of problems on my end:
1. Poor communication.
One artist I used to deal with was only via email. I'd say, "I'll email you on Friday." But then wouldn't contact her until Saturday because I was so tired from my 12-hour shift. I did that thing 3 times. She must have gotten mad because she finished an illustration for me then refused to answer my emails after payment. Can't blame her. No matter how tired I was, I could have contacted her in some manner.

2. Not getting money on time.
I told one artist I'd get to send his work on Friday and I'd have the money for him. Before Friday came around, I found out I urgently had bills that needed to be paid, meaning I wouldn't be able to pay him fully until the next Friday, when I got paid again. I told him this, and he was understanding, but he had the work by Friday and there was no payment. Even though he was cool with waiting a week, it was unprofessional.

3. Not reading things clearly.
I once got an illustration and was charged more than I originally thought. I informed the artist of this and he told me to look at his commission page. Turns out he charged extra for background scenes and I didn't look at that finely. I felt stupid for being angry at feeling robbed.

4. Amateur-looking script.
I don't even wanna describe it, but I have sent artists the most amateur-looking scripts before I realized I should have a comic script format as professional as a movie script. I got turned down by several artists before I realized what was wrong.

Examples of problems on the artist's end:
1. Late work.
I asked an artist to do a 4-panel comic strip. Nothing fancy. Little background, one character drawn in a cartoon style, no color or letter, just pencil and ink. Told me it was gonna take him 2 days. I got it in a week. I contacted him a few times during that time to ask if it was ready and he seemed to be resentful as if I was rushing him.

2. Changing my work without my permission.
I've had artists noticeably change the action in the work without my permission. If they want to change it, I'd love to discuss it before they do it. I don't want to wait until I get it to see my work has changed without my permission.

3. Procrastination.
The artist said I get two free revisions if I didn't like it. I didn't like it so I asked for a revision. That was on Thursday and he said he'd have it by Saturday. Saturday came around with no revision. When I asked why, he said he hadn't started it yet. I got it on Monday.

4. Quoting me the wrong times.
I've had artists say, "It can take me 1-2 days per page to do your comic due to what I'm reading here in the script and the art style you want." Perfect. I hire him. Then I get one page in 4-5 days each. Not perfect.

All in all, I blame myself. I believe this is entirely due to not having everything written down in contract. By having things written down, you know what you want, you look more professional (so you're taken more seriously), and you reduce chances of slip-ups. This stuff here is invaluable to someone seeking a collaborator. It'll help things go smoothly.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby Driftline » July 29th, 2016, 9:31 am

I have a few more things, but I'll say them later when I have time. But I do want to give good links to writing a comic script.

Comicbookscriptarchive.com has some good script examples. Check them out here:

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/a ... e-scripts/

I like the Comic Experience Script Template the best because it is simple and straightforward. Writing a script based on that template will neither overwhelm the writer nor anyone else viewing it. While I like comic books as much as anyone here, I don't think they need to be written like Hollywood movie scripts. That's overkill and too much work for a comic book. Make it professional and simple.

I also like this this blog post by Chris Oatley. He gives more detail on the script process:
http://chrisoatley.com/how-to-write-a-c ... ok-script/

Good luck.
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby SophiaTheDork » April 15th, 2017, 5:53 pm

Hello. I am currently working on creating a webcomic of my own, and I was wondering if people do Collaborations expecting money out if it. Do people want money for helping or do they just like helping you?
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Re: READ ME: Tips for finding a Collaboration

Postby eishiya » April 15th, 2017, 6:21 pm

SophiaTheDork wrote:Hello. I am currently working on creating a webcomic of my own, and I was wondering if people do Collaborations expecting money out if it. Do people want money for helping or do they just like helping you?

You'll find both kinds of people here. Compensating people will usually make it easier to find people who'll work with you and stick around for longer than a few pages.
If you want to do an unpaid collaboration, you'll have a much easier time offering a project that's short and isn't a huge commitment. People who volunteer their time for free generally want to be able to either finish the project quickly, or to be able to leave at any given time without feeling bad about it. It's very difficult to find someone who'll commit to a long-term project for free - even people who'd like to do a long project usually end up being unable to because their circumstances change.

tl;dr:
For a project that'll take more than a few weeks to do, you should expect to pay your collaborator to keep them committed.
For a shorter project, you should be able to find someone who'll collaborate for free, if you make a good impression.
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