Random Comic Tips and Questions

Discuss the art of creating art here. Share tutorials and tips with your fellow comic creators.

Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby V3ra » April 24th, 2015, 10:17 am

If you want to draw a scene take a little piece of paper and draw where everyone is standing, stick figure style. This way it doesn't seem confusing when you want to draw something like a simple coffee scene or a battle scene and the characters move.
I can't think of anything witty to put here.
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby walkin_talkin_apocolyps » April 25th, 2015, 12:54 pm

wow this is actually a really snazzy awesome thread! i dont know why i never looked at it before.

so i dont know if these tips were said yet but whatdaheck

-havin somethin move from left to right in a comic makes it seem faster (because we read left to right in english). havin somethin move right to left makes it seem slower

-if you wanna have a crowd/group of somethin but dont want to actually draw a million things then draw at least 3 of them and it will kinda imply theres a crowd

EDIT:
thought of another one i just learned!
-make a outline for yur comic before you write it. its really handy for makin sure you dont forget to write things you want to put in there. BUT ALSO the amount of points on yur outline should giva ya a good idea about how many pages it'll be
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby hestia.edwards » June 26th, 2015, 8:06 pm

I have some tips pertaining to traditional inking nibs:

1. Speedball products, to be polite, are [i]cheap[i]: avoid at all costs. I do recommend Tachikawa, Zebra and Kuratake brands for making solid nibs that make beautiful lines.

2. The maru nib needs just the right ink and paper, or it will fight with you: I found manga manuscript paper and Pilot drafting ink to work well.

3. I use a flame to burn the coating off the nibs, but I have not tried the lemon juice idea yet.

4. After you dip the nib into the ink well, give a gentle jerk so that loose ink will fall off into the well: you don't want ink splatters on your paper!
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby eishiya » November 2nd, 2016, 11:51 am

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When drawing speech bubble tails and connectors, they'll look better and more "balanced" if they appear to emanate from the centre of the bubble. This doesn't mean that they actually have to come out in the exact centre of one of the sides! It just means if you continue the tail/connector into the bubble as an imaginary line, it should touch the centre. In the right-most example above, the tail is quite noticeably to the left, but points to the middle of the bubble.
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby DavidPerry » March 12th, 2017, 1:26 am

eishiya wrote:Image

When drawing speech bubble tails and connectors, they'll look better and more "balanced" if they appear to emanate from the centre of the bubble. This doesn't mean that they actually have to come out in the exact centre of one of the sides! It just means if you continue the tail/connector into the bubble as an imaginary line, it should touch the centre. In the right-most example above, the tail is quite noticeably to the left, but points to the middle of the bubble.


It wasn't until you mentioned this that I noticed that I do this naturally, and you're right. It looks really strange if it doesn't lead from the center of the bubble.
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby DuskShores » April 8th, 2017, 6:03 pm

Like some other people have said, not sure if it's come up yet. I'm only just beginning to read through all this myself, but I wanted to pass on a little bit of advice I always use with everything I write.

Swearing. Everyone does it, except for a few exceptions, like kids and stuff. But not everyone's a sailor, so you have to make sure that you use it properly. If you're going to drop the F-bomb, make sure it fits the scenario. A character walks into a room and greets their friends? Unless it's a character's specific trait (such as Gamzee Makara), it probably wouldn't be best. A character sees one of their allies, or even a relative, get chopped in half? Probably a good time for you to drop that elusive F-Word.

On top of this, you'll almost never see the C-word used in comics, and most likely for a reason. I've never felt right using the word in anything I do, simply because it's too strong, which, I feel, at least, kinda takes away from the moment. Of course, there can be exceptions, but most of the time, it's better to use other forms of genitalia to refer to someone's actions or personality.
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby Caroline Parkinson » June 8th, 2017, 5:38 am

There's a lot of pro lettering tips on Blambot . You can find them at the link below. For example: only use a crossbarred "I" for the personal pronoun or occasional acronyms. I don't always follow them but I should!
http://blambot.com/articles_tips.shtml

From an interview by Fiona Staples who draws the awesome comic Saga: if you want your comic to be accessible to those who don't read comics regularly, use a low panel count and end each page on a cliffhanger panel. It doesn't have to be life-and death: someone trying to get the top off a jam jar works too!
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby BestBuilder101 » August 7th, 2017, 1:02 pm

Hmmmm... well, I like to use coloured pencils to color in drawings. Would that help?
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby JakiraJurosawa » May 3rd, 2018, 7:35 pm

walkin_talkin_apocolyps wrote:wow this is actually a really snazzy awesome thread! i dont know why i never looked at it before.

so i dont know if these tips were said yet but whatdaheck

-havin somethin move from left to right in a comic makes it seem faster (because we read left to right in english). havin somethin move right to left makes it seem slower

-if you wanna have a crowd/group of somethin but dont want to actually draw a million things then draw at least 3 of them and it will kinda imply theres a crowd

EDIT:
thought of another one i just learned!
-make a outline for yur comic before you write it. its really handy for makin sure you dont forget to write things you want to put in there. BUT ALSO the amount of points on yur outline should giva ya a good idea about how many pages it'll be


Ooooooooo really good tips! I never thought about the panel thing:3
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Re: Random Comic Tips and Questions

Postby Shard » May 7th, 2018, 5:22 pm

I can't remember if these have been listed before but if they have they bear repeating so screw it-

Thumbnail Thumbnail Thumbnail- This is the art of making a very rough sketch of your comic page that helps you lay out what everyone's doing, where everyone's standing, and what everyone's saying. It can be as detailed or as vague as you want it to be; as long as you have something. It's a lifesaver for planning future events, or if you get writer's block, because everything's already written down - you just need to make the final product.

Panel Variationing- Unless you're doing a Strip A Day style comic, using the same-size panel layout can get dull after a while. Even just varying the size of each box can help mix things up a bit. Don't be afraid to experiment with your panel types to add some spice into your pages, and fiddle with how things look to make it more interesting. Thumbnailing can help with this - if you don't like the way it looks on the thumbnail, you can change it up, and you won't have done all the work of making the final panel so you'll be less likely to say "well I already did all that so there's no sense changing it now".

Panel Moodbuilding- That said, your panels should match the situation the comic is currently in. If your characters are in the middle of a fight, have diagonal panels! Make things a bit chaotic to represent the fast-paced action that's happening. But in the same breath, if people are just standing around and talking, there's not much reason to have weird diagonal panels because things have slowed down - diagonal panels will just make things seem hyperactive when they're really not. If you want to emphasize drama and action in scenes like that then by all means! But try and have the panels you're using match what's happening in the comic. Comics are a highly visual medium, so you should take advantage of every single aspect of that - not just the pictures inside of the panels.

Order Your Bubbles- A simple point, but make sure it's obvious which order the speech bubbles should be read in. A reader shouldn't have to stop and figure out what they should be reading first- it should be intuitive and self-evident that this bubble needs to be read before that one, and so on.

Mind Your Punctuation- Everyone has a different way of speaking and typing, and that's fine! But be careful what punctuation goes at the end of a sentence. If all of your characters' dialogue ends with an exclamation point, it can take out some of the tension of a serious scene- exclamation points are usually used for excitement or, well, loud exclamations. They shouldn't be used for two characters discussing an important revelation unless that revelation is causing them to react in that way. Also, if every line of dialogue has the same emphasis, it can take away from the ones that are meant to have actual emphasis behind them.

Sound Effect Consistency- This is admittedly something I'm guilty of. If you use sound effects, remember to actually use them when it'd be appropriate. I don't know of anything that doesn't use sound effects, but there are times when one page will have sound effects everywhere, and then the next page - which has the same amount of things going on as the previous one - is lacking them. Unless there's a reason for the sudden lack of sound, it can be a bit jarring to suddenly have no sound effects when they were in the previous page(s).

Hope this helps people!
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