How does one get fans?

Kick back and chat it up with other Jeeves Smackers.

How does one get fans?

Postby Macchiato! » April 14th, 2019, 3:11 pm

I have a new comic that I posted here called Macchiato, but I was wondering how the top comics go about getting fans here?
I see some comics that have amazing art and update frequently look great that seem to have very few fans, whereas others that don't look as impressive have hundreds.

Was hoping you could just give me some insight.

Thanks!
Macchiato!
 
Posts: 2
Joined: April 2nd, 2019, 6:43 pm

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby Songdog » April 14th, 2019, 3:24 pm

Tell a good story, update regularly, comment on other comics, and be patient. Comics that update regularly bring back readers and have more presence on the front page. It also helps if you're uploading on other sites, as SJ can be a bit hard to gain an audience. But just be patient is all. No one builds a reader base over night.

I also don't know if it's fair to equate good art=deserves readers. Some stories appeal to people more, and if I find a comic with fantastic art but a boring story, I probably still won't read it. I'm more interested in engaging characters than pretty art, and I think many others would agree. Especially if that impressive art means a slow-update time. I'm not a very talented artist myself but I've managed to gain a small-readerbase, just by appealing to certain niches. Make what you love, enjoy making it, and people will find it if you have enough patience.

Sometimes luck is just a part of it too.
User avatar
Songdog
 
Posts: 16
Joined: January 1st, 2018, 6:53 pm

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby racarter » April 16th, 2019, 9:08 pm

^ All of that plus as much advertising as you can. Webcomic directories, ads, connecting with other creators, using social media to promote your comic. Twitter has been the most effective for me using social media, if you know what accounts to @. You can try a sub4sub thing too, tho that’s mostly something done on Tapas since you can see who follows your comic.
User avatar
racarter
 
Posts: 8
Joined: September 11th, 2018, 11:30 am

Blue-footed.

Postby Cope » May 18th, 2019, 5:07 pm

Boobies.
Image
User avatar
Cope
 
Posts: 7
Joined: December 2nd, 2010, 11:11 pm

Re: Blue-footed.

Postby artofjoe » May 19th, 2019, 4:02 pm

Cope wrote:Boobies.

That's exactly why I read your comic! ;)

I'm just kidding, I actually really enjoy the crazy plot and the characters, and the artstyle feels similar to comics I read as a kid, but this is actually a pretty big point.

Having visual appeal, whatever that may be (sexual, colorful, humorous...etc), is definitely a giant factor. I'd go so far as to say the biggest of the main 3.
All sorts of artstyles have different ways they can be appealing. While a lot of people dislike hyper-masculine/hyper feminine artstyles, consider that those are currently the kinds of comic books we see on T.V. Giving your characters some "sexier" features like shredded muscles or (you know) "boobies" might get people to pay more attention to what's going on in the picture rather than only reading the words. But you don't need to compromise your own uniqueness to fit that if those aren't the kinds of fans you want in the first place, as there are all sorts of ways to make art look appealing.
Art is usually the first thing a person is going to notice when starting a comic and is probably half of what is going to keep them around. I have some purposefully poorly drawn comics on my favorites list and that's because the art was a part of the humor and it worked well with it enough for me to enjoy the art for what it was.
In the end, create for you and not for your fans.
The author of One Piece, one of the most popular manga series' to date, does indeed put a lot of emphasis on the hyper-sexiness of his characters. He draws most of his female characters in a certain way because that's what he likes. He does receive a lot of negativity from this from certain people, but it's obvious he isn't doing it to hurt anybody, he's just drawing what he wants to draw because it looks appealing to him. And I think that has merit to it. If you really don't think what appeals to you is that different than the average person, then drawing like that will probably bring in some people.

In the words of Stan Lee: " I have always tried to please myself, not other people, and somehow, it seems to have worked because I guess I'm not that different than other people. So, to wrap it up, what I suggest is, use your imagination, don't be afraid to come up with the wildest thought in the world. If what you create is truly different and colorful, and if it's written well, people will enjoy it."

in general, advertising, consistency and patience have a much rarer chance of doing you much good if your comic doesn't have some appeal. It is important if you want quicker results though. But like what Song Dog said, art isn't everything and doesn't merit fans alone, there are many factors. However, art is going to be most people's initial hook in the realm of comics, so i think it should be a very high priority right next to writing. Since it's a "graphic novel" I think both of those are equally important. Advertising and being consistent and honest with your fans are also big deals on getting new fans and then also keeping them. If people like it enough for the art and/or the writing, most will be willing to wait through a hiatus, but if those fans are patrons, delivering what you've promised them is going to be a huge factor in keeping them there.

I think art is the biggest factor to get people to enter your world, and the writing is the biggest factor keeping them there. But I may be wrong.
(if someone disagrees, feel free to change my mind on this, I'm no comic guru so I try to keep an open mind and learn new things. That's just what I've observed from my own experience so far)
Image
User avatar
artofjoe
 
Posts: 40
Joined: May 12th, 2016, 8:57 pm
Location: Dragon Roost Island

Re: Blue-footed.

Postby Bliss » May 21st, 2019, 4:31 pm

Cope wrote:Boobies.

This sprinkled with some Eeveelutions.
Image
User avatar
Bliss
 
Posts: 98
Joined: June 4th, 2009, 7:51 pm

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby mitchellbravo » May 21st, 2019, 5:17 pm

Target or sometimes walgreens has them
oly: we draw stories about imaginary people
Image
Do not feet infants to honey under one year of age.
me: Posh, Baby, Sporty, and Scary Ham
robybang: Together they're Spiced Ham
User avatar
mitchellbravo
 
Posts: 6436
Joined: October 11th, 2010, 1:31 pm
Location: too tired

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby Squirreltastic-Blue » May 21st, 2019, 5:20 pm

mitchellbravo wrote:Target or sometimes walgreens has them

Can you take me to a Walgreens? I've never been!
Image
User avatar
Squirreltastic-Blue
 
Posts: 136
Joined: November 13th, 2012, 7:41 am
Location: Tree

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby Ulta » May 22nd, 2019, 4:29 pm

Just keep making pages, preferably on a schedule. If your story and writing is good, the fans will come. You might even get spotlit with such perseverance, and that will definitely help your comic get exposure! Persistence and dedication pays off, although I am aware this is a luxury not many can do.
Image
User avatar
Ulta
 
Posts: 34
Joined: July 27th, 2013, 3:42 am

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby marchwinds » May 24th, 2019, 12:36 am

i dont have many but i'd assume you just make good stuff, isnt that kind of why this place exists
User avatar
marchwinds
 
Posts: 1
Joined: May 15th, 2019, 9:27 pm

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby eishiya » May 24th, 2019, 8:48 am

marchwinds wrote:i dont have many but i'd assume you just make good stuff, isnt that kind of why this place exists

No one's going to read your comic, no matter how good it is, if they don't know it exists.

There is so much is clamouring for people's attention that very few people browse the Internet (including webcomic sites) long enough to find new things, and even with discovery algorithms in place, there is often so much (good!) material out there that the chances of a potential reader actually finding your comic are pretty slim. So no, just making good stuff, while important, is usually not good enough. You need to do more to get your comic seen by people. Then, if it's good and to their taste, they'll keep reading.

Social media tweets, banner ads, getting into webcomic listings, none of these things are a windfall, but they help and are worth the effort. You have to do things that let people know about your comic.

A lot of the "promotion" that really pays off is often not about the comic itself, but comes from unrelated things the author does. Many artists draw fanart that gets shared around and gets them new followers, who then discover their comic (through their social media, usually). The comic Stand Still Stay Silent got a big boost in readership when one of its infographics (one dealing with real-world languages and not just SSSS-specific stuff) went viral for how well-drawn and informative it was. In my own case, I know a number of readers found my comic through art critiques I posted on various art forums (found them interesting/useful, checked my profile links). I even think a few found it through my Twitch profile after chatting with me about random stuff in somebody else's chat. So, I guess while it's difficult to put your comic where people can find it, it's easier to put yourself where people can find you, and that can spill over into the comic.

(Naturally, I barely do any of the above, even though I know I should ;_; )
Image
User avatar
eishiya
 
Posts: 9685
Joined: December 5th, 2009, 11:17 am

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby Akhdas » June 12th, 2019, 5:38 am

You buy it from an electric store


Idk, have something in your comic to latch on to. See the market you sell the product.
User avatar
Akhdas
 
Posts: 2
Joined: July 13th, 2016, 10:46 pm

Re: How does one get fans?

Postby JoKeR » June 15th, 2019, 4:57 am

As an artist ... you are the product :ugeek:
Image

-=: jokercologne.deviantart twitter.com/JoKeRcologne joker-cologne.tumblr :=-

Expect the unexpected. Never take anything for granted. Scrutinise everything. Be open-minded. Learn.
User avatar
JoKeR
 
Posts: 2543
Joined: June 10th, 2010, 3:42 am
Location: A City with a huge cathedral


Return to General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 13 guests